Medium format camera • PhotoReView, cameras: the democratization of the medium format is underway

Cameras: the democratization of the medium format is underway

Contents

If the difference is visible on not manipulated files, the dynamic deviation also allows margins of postproduction, and therefore creative possibilities, much more important. In order to test the possibilities available in practice for users, we have chosen to use the software available for each of the two boxes: the excellent Capture One for the Sony case (designed by the manufacturer of medium format ONE phase boxes and very largely Breakdown among the most demanding professionals) and the Hasselblad proprietary Phocus software (alone capable of developing the RAW files of the Swedish manufacturer). In order not to blur the results, we have manipulated here only the adjustment allowing to catch up with information in the highlights (in essence much more delicate to catch up than the digital shadows). By pushing the adjustment to the maximum, we realize that while these areas are clearer on the original file from the average sensor, the level of recovery of the density is higher while retaining a more natural colorimetric rendering (L ‘gray sail effect is less marked).

Middle digital format

The Swedish specialist Hasselblad has just announced his new medium format camera: Hasselblad X2D 100c. This very high -end model incorporates a stabilized 100 MP sensor, a hybrid phase detection autofocus system and promises a dynamic range of more than 15 it. A full upgrade of the current Hasselblad X1D II 50c.

Source: Vivre-de-la-Photo.fr • Estimated reading time: 5 min. • scooped on September 18, 2022 • Word (s) key (s): medium format camera, Hasselblad

Fujifilm GFX 50S II test: the medium format at the gates of accessibility

The Fujifilm GFX 50S II constitutes for Fuji the gateway to the world of the Middle Format. Using the template of the GFX100S while incorporating the GFX50S sensor, this is a camera that is both intriguing and attractive.

Source: lenumerics.com • Estimated reading time: 9 min. • scooped on October 10, 2021 • Word (s) key (s): medium format camera, Fujifilm

Fujifilm GFX 50S II and GF 35-70mm: the light and affordable Middle Format

More than an update of the GFX 50S, it is a lightened GFX 100s. This approach allows the manufacturer to offer the most affordable Middle Format in history, with a 24 × 36 mm mid-range rate… It is accompanied by a new Kit goal, the GF 35 -70mm F4.5-5.6 Wr.

Source: Missnumeric.com • Estimated reading time: 5 min. • scooped on September 6, 2021 • Word (s): medium format camera, Fujifilm

Fujifilm GFX 100S test: Excellence of the Middle Format in a conventional template

After the GFX100, an extravagant monobloc hybrid of 102 MPX, Fujifilm declines its medium format device in a reduced template. The GFX 100S retains the characteristics of its big brother, while being much more compact. Here is his test ..

Source: lenumerics.com • Estimated reading time: 13 min. • scooped on April 14, 2021 • Word (s) Key (s): medium format camera, Fujifilm

Cameras: the democratization of the medium format is underway

While we now find full -format hybrids with proven qualities released a few years ago around 1000 euros, and their big brothers in professional ranges offer new performance in all areas, some manufacturers have done in recent years bet on the opening of the very exclusive medium format to a wider audience.

Source: Frandroid.com • Estimated reading time: 16 min. • scooped on February 9, 2021 • Word (s) key (s): medium format camera, photo market

Fujifilm GFX 100S: A medium format 102 mpx sensor in a compact case for € 5,999

During its latest event X-Summit Global 2021, Fujifilm unveils the GFX 100S, a new high-resolution medium format hybrid which takes up the concept of the GFX 100-to the 102 MPx sensor-in a more compact and lighter version.

Source: Phototrend.fr • Estimated reading time: 9 min. • scooped on February 2, 2021 • Word (s) key (s): medium format camera, Fujifilm

Hasselblad 907x 50c camera test: an exceptional way

Accustomed to the medium format, the Swedish Hasselblad presents the 907x 50c. Beyond its retro pace and its 50 MP sensor, this digital camera wishes to make the link between modernity and the origin of the brand.

Source: lenumerics.com • Estimated reading time: 11 min. • scooped on September 22, 2020 • Word (s): medium format camera, Hasselblad

Hasselblad 907x 50c: the new case and its medium format back of 50 MP available

Last year, Hasselblad had unveiled the development of a new average CFV II 50c format digital back and a new 907X case. Here they are finally available: the opportunity to come back in more detail on these two products that combine tradition and modernity.

Source: Phototrend.fr • Estimated reading time: 3 min. • scooped on September 1, 2020 • Word (s) key (s): medium format camera, Hasselblad

Fujifilm presents the Fujinon GF 30 mm F3.5 R WR and an update for its medium format boxes

Fujifilm medium -format sensor boxes will accommodate a new goal. The Fujinon GF 30 mm F3.5 r Wr. Equivalent to 24 mm in 24 × 36, this is the second high angle lens for the GF mount. GFX devices are also updated.

Source: lenumerics.com • Estimated reading time: 3 min. • scooped on July 3, 2020 • Word (s): medium format camera, Fujifilm

Leica S3: The new medium-format hybrid case includes a 64 MP sensor

Presented exclusively at the 2018 photokina, Leica officially unveils its new medium -format box, the Leica S3. Designed for both a photo and video use, it incorporates a new very high definition sensor of 64 MP, authorizes the 4K cinema recording and is provided with Wi-Fi connectivity.

Source: Phototrend.fr • Estimated reading time: 3 min. • scooped on March 9, 2020 • Word (s) key (s): medium format camera, leica

ONE phase announces the XT, a compact and original medium format system

After a few days of an orchestrated teasing to fuel rumors, One Phase One unveiled the XT, an average format device system which, despite its compactness and apparent ease of use, was designed to operate with the digital backs of 150 and 100 MP of the brand.

Source: lense.fr • Estimated reading time: 2 min. • scooped on September 12, 2019 • Word (s) key (s): hybrid camera, medium format camera, Fujifilm

Fujifilm GFX 100: test, price and technical sheet

The medium format hybrid GFX 100 presents itself as a concentrate of technology and must assume its place as a standard holder in the Fujifilm range. Do the results live up to the brand’s ambitions ? Answer in this test ..

Source: lenumerics.com • Estimated reading time: 17 min. • scooped on August 30, 2019 • Word (s) Key (s): medium format camera, Fujifilm

Hasselblad x1d II 50c, the most affordable medium format hybrid of the Swedish

Hasselblad has just unveiled the Mark II version of its Middle Format X1D-50C hybrid housing as well as an XCD 35-75 mm zoom and an iPad compatible version of its phocus Mobile 2 image editing software 2.

Source: Phototrend.fr • Estimated reading time: 3 min. • scooped on June 20, 2019 • Word (s) key (s): medium format camera, Hasselblad

Fujifilm GFX100: 100 million stabilized pixels

Fujifilm finally lifts the veil on its long -awaited medium format GFX100. An extraordinary camera that is characterized by an medium format stabilized sensor of 100 million pixels, a phase correlation autofocus and the capacity to film in 4K 30p. Unique characteristics that will appear at € 10,999.

Source: lense.fr • Estimated reading time: 5 min. • scooped on May 25, 2019 • Word (s) key (s): medium format camera, Fujifilm

Fujifilm GFX 50R: Complete test

With this device, the Japanese manufacturer aims to bring out this type of sensor outside the studios, thanks to reduced dimensions and a more affordable price.

Source: lenumerics.com • Estimated reading time: 10 min. • scooped on December 20, 2018 • Word (s) key (s): medium format camera, Fujifilm

Cameras: the democratization of the medium format is underway

Beyond the Full Frame 24 x 36 sensor cameras, some boxes have medium -format sensors. So far offered especially to professionals, they are becoming more and more democrating.

The Pentax 645Z Pentax photo sensor

While we now find full -format hybrids with proven qualities released a few years ago around 1000 euros, and their big brothers in professional ranges offer new performance in all areas, some manufacturers have done in recent years bet on the opening of the very exclusive medium format to a wider audience.

In recent years Fuji, Pentax and the Swedish manufacturer Hasselblad in particular have released more versatile models, some of which have now displayed a price equivalent to that of the high -end 24 x 36.

The Pentax 645Z

The Pentax 645Z // Source: Olivier Gonin

Hasselblad X1D II-50C

Hasselblad x1d II-50C // Source: Olivier Gonin

Fujifilm GFX 50R

Fujifilm GFX 50R // Source: Olivier Gonin

This choice constitutes for all beautiful image aficionados a very good news. Indeed, since the advent of the digital age, the Middle Format has long remained extremely expensive and its use imposed a large number of constraints. It has therefore largely remained for many years the prerogative of a restricted fringe of the professional world and essentially confined to static practices and most often in the studio, despite some rare outdoor excursions in very conditions special. Now this is no longer the case and several models of different manufacturers allow an extended audience to consider new possibilities. In order to offer a non -exhaustive panel of the different possibilities offered at “Studied”, We have chosen to use in external conditions three boxes with separate profiles (two hybrids and a SLR): Hasselblad X1D II-50c, Fuji GFX 50R and Pentax 645Z.

“Middle format” ?

It is today quite hard to imagine, because the 24 x 36 – often described as “Full frame” – is for many users synonymous with high quality in digital. However, it is historically considered a small format in silver photography. Indeed, one of the major challenges of the first decades of the 20th century is to produce more handy devices than bulky photographic chambers. Several European, Japanese and American manufacturers are embarking on the adventure and their research gives birth to a wide variety of boxes and dandruff. During several decades of successive innovations, a classification has been gradually established and makes it possible to differentiate them:

  • Films with dimensions equal to 4 × 5 inch (about 10 x 12.5 cm per image) reserved for so -called rooms ” large format “
  • Films of size 24 x 36 mm and lower, from cinema dandruff, called ” small format “ (24 x 36 is now called “Full format” in digital), which have become the most widespread
  • The between two, said “Middle format”, Group films that have become exclusively in 120 or 220 format (6 cm in width, only the length varies between these two standards),

Mainly reserved for very well informed users since the development of 24 x 36 with the general public and many professionals, the successive appearance of medium -sized formats with very varied characteristics have allowed extremely diverse uses. From studio to Street photography, From portrait to the landscape, including architecture, many famous images made with these devices often rented for their image quality and reliability (ex: the photos taken by the first human beings on the Moon).

In the digital age, the price of the medium format is stratospheric

With the advent of the digital image, the sensors replace the film and their size tends to be reduced. Indeed, producing large sensitive surfaces is then a technical challenge and research-development costs explode the price of devices. During its reappearance in the digital age, the price of the medium format is therefore stratospheric and, despite a lower trend, its cost remains very high and the canton in very high -end professional shots in advertising or in mode. To get an idea of ​​it, when Pentax released the 645D in 2010, he divides overall by two the cost of the entry ticket into this universe, while the price of this case is still around 10,000 euros (bare box )).

The quality of images above all: the fundamental importance of the dynamics

The main characteristic of the medium format, and its determining asset, is the large size of its sensor. All the medium format boxes allowing both a relatively easy use and a contained price level to date, compared to previous standards, are equipped with the same sensor, a Sony CMOS of 50 megapixels with dimensions of 33 x 44 mm (4/3 format therefore), a 1.7 x surface greater than the “Full format” (24 x 36 mm).

These dimensions allow it in particular to propose a compromise resolution/dynamic greater than 24 x 36. Dynamics is a poorly known, but fundamental concept in photography: this is the ability to restore elements of a scene despite significant light differences between its different zones. A very common case in outdoor photos is the difficulty of avoiding skies “Percés” (white) when photographing with dark elements in the first plans (eg: in the shade or against the light). All other things being equal, the dynamics are strongly determined by the quantity of light captured. It is therefore generally proportional to the surface of each photosite (area of ​​the sensor which collects light in order to create a pixel). It is from this point of view that the upper dimensions of the sensitive surface allow it better than with more common devices with full format sensors or APS-C.

For example, here is an image made with the Fuji GFX 50R for which the importance of the dynamics permitted by the Middle Format has been essential.

Image not modified // Source: Olivier Gonin

Image not modified // Source: Olivier Gonin

Modified image // Source: Olivier Gonin

Modified image // Source: Olivier Gonin

The areas containing highlights (such as skies) are here the main beneficiaries of the important modifications made in postproduction (essential equivalent of the silver print) to achieve these results. On unlumded files, they seem to be pierced in many places (without any information than white) or little detailed while thanks to the sensor dynamics, these difficult areas always conceal information that postproduction makes it possible to reveal.

Dynamics: 24 x 36 high definition vs medium format

In the example below, we compare the results obtained in similar conditions (same day, same time to a few minutes and even place a few meters for practical reasons) with a very good 24 x 36 high definition of the last Generation, the Sony A7R IV, and the X1DII-50C of Hasselblad.

The files below are non-retouched JPEGS obtained from RAW file in order to be as close as possible to the native capabilities of the sensors.

The Pentax 645Z Pentax photo sensor

Photo of the Sony A7R IV // Source: Olivier Gonin

Photo of Hasselblad X1DII-50C

Photo of Hasselblad X1DII-50C // Source: Olivier Gonin

The two above images were made with adjustments to theoretically transport to the two sensors the same level of light intensity. Overall, the image from the Hasselblad case is slightly less dense, a sign of a native sensitivity probably a little superior, but the difference is discreet. If the highlights are logically located at a higher level on the image from the X1DII, the difference is much more marked in average tones (grass) with a much more subtle rendering for the Hasselblad case. The difference is also visible at the level of the raised shadows of the seated characters. They are much more detailed in the image from the Middle Format sensor, a sign of a larger native dynamic thanks to the upper surface of the photosites. The difference is indeed too significant to be only due to the slight difference in native sensitivity of the sensors noted above.

If the difference is visible on not manipulated files, the dynamic deviation also allows margins of postproduction, and therefore creative possibilities, much more important. In order to test the possibilities available in practice for users, we have chosen to use the software available for each of the two boxes: the excellent Capture One for the Sony case (designed by the manufacturer of medium format ONE phase boxes and very largely Breakdown among the most demanding professionals) and the Hasselblad proprietary Phocus software (alone capable of developing the RAW files of the Swedish manufacturer). In order not to blur the results, we have manipulated here only the adjustment allowing to catch up with information in the highlights (in essence much more delicate to catch up than the digital shadows). By pushing the adjustment to the maximum, we realize that while these areas are clearer on the original file from the average sensor, the level of recovery of the density is higher while retaining a more natural colorimetric rendering (L ‘gray sail effect is less marked).

Photo of the Sony A7R IV (catches up only highlights) // Source: Olivier Gonin

Photo of the Sony A7R IV (catches up only highlights) // Source: Olivier Gonin

Photo of the Hasselblad X1DII-50C (Cased only highlights) // Source: Olivier Gonin

Photo of the Hasselblad X1DII-50C (Cased only highlights) // Source: Olivier Gonin

Finally we have pushed the sliders of different settings to try to obtain the results the best possible results from these images taken in difficult conditions. We can easily see that it is from the image from the medium format box that the correction margin is the most important.

Photo of the Sony A7R IV // Source: Olivier Gonin

Photo of the Sony A7R IV // Source: Olivier Gonin

Photo of Hasselblad x1dii-50c // Source: Olivier Gonin

Photo of Hasselblad X1DII-50C // Source: Olivier Gonin

Let us recall in passing that the three medium format boxes used here are equipped with the same sensor. Despite electronics and treatment specific to each manufacturer causing nuances, they are therefore generally capable of performance of the same order in the field of Dynamics of RAW files (gross). For professionals or experts sometimes forced to operate in delicate situations, it is significant security. Obviously, it is in the case of large -format prints, extremely demanding, that the difference with the 24 x 36 is the most visible. It is nevertheless noticeable even on limited formats as we see in the above examples.

Often little known to the general public, it should also be noted that the advantages of a high dynamic are not confined to difficult situations. Indeed, it also allows in a more standard situation to produce images that are both contrasting and detailed in all areas of the image. This characteristic therefore has a major interest in portrait or landscape for example.

Middle format video: potential still in fallow

The possibility of filming with cameras with sensors of dimensions greater than many cameras that appeared at the end of the 2000s has radically transformed the visual universe in which we evolve. The vogue of the depths of reduced field, hitherto confined to the cinema and certain very high -end advertisements, has not always been dried up.

However, medium -format devices now also offer the possibility of filming, and some manufacturers have caught dreaming thanks to the association of very large sensors and the excellent existing optical park. They wondered if, after the democratization of the background blur, these devices would not allow to reconnect with the magnificent rendering of the 70 mm which made the happiness of certain big names of cinema like Sergio Leone or, more recently, Quentin Tarantino.

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To date, the video modes of the means formats have always been faced with those of the lower ranges models. In reverse of the generalization of the UHD, here the Full HD is the queen definition (the X1DII of Hasselblad still offers a 2.7 k mode), the only proposed compression format is 4: 2: 0- 8 bits and the choice of cadence differs a little between the models, but overall it is reduced to sorrow. Similarly, the absence of a device allowing the correlation of phase on the sensor forced into practice to manually ensure the changes of points, which with such reduced field depths is a challenge. Digital formats do not allow for the moment to easily film.

Similarly, despite promising recent announcements, none of the boxes available to date offers sensor stabilization, an essential element to film easily by hand.

You will understand, in the universe of the medium format, the key word is not the versatility of the boxes. Intended for very demanding users for specific practices, devices have marked profiles.

Three very diverse box profiles

For a long time, average photography digital format has very largely seen confined to the universe of the studio due to various technical constraints imposing a particular logistics (size, low battery life, dust sensitivity, files of files too high in look at storage supports then available, etc.) and its very high cost.

The three boxes tested were designed to get out of this shackles. We therefore chose to use them in very diverse conditions in order to see if this promise was held.

Hasselblad X1DII-50C: the photo posed outdoors as a favorite field

In order to confront the most compact of the three boxes, the Hasselblad X1DII-50C, at a high level of requirement, we decided to use it in the context of night strolls in Paris. First observation: the manufacturing quality is high and the comfort of use is significantly higher than that offered by a high -end 24 x 36. This comfort is due in particular to an electronic viewfinder with particularly pleasant generous dimensions, even when the brightness is reduced. Another good surprise, the XCD 45p f/4 lens was designed to agree with the beautiful ergonomic study of the case. The whole allows a reduction in unprecedented size in the medium format (higher than that of a 24 x 36 hybrid with a fixed light focal.

The Hasselblad X1D II-50C can record RAW 16 bits

The Hasselblad X1D II-50C can record RAW 16 bits // Source: Olivier Gonin
Hasselblad X1D II-50C // Source: Olivier Gonin connectors

The back of the Hasselblad X1D II-50c

The back of the Hasselblad X1D II-50C // Source: Olivier Gonin
The handle of the Hasselblad X1D II-50C // Source: Olivier Gonin

Unsurprisingly, the image quality is there and the aircraft is very comfortable as an urban architecture shot.

Photo of Hasselblad X1D II-50c Photo of Hasselblad X1D II-50c Photo of Hasselblad X1D II-50c

Apart from the size of the sensor, which allows both to benefit from a very high resolution and a comfortable dynamic, the possibility of saving the RAW files in 16 bits is also an important element. Indeed, it is today largely absent from 24 x 36 as of the two other medium format boxes (the Fuji GFX 50R and the Pentax 645Z) whose raw files are coded on 14 bits. This may seem minimal, but in reality a difference from two bits to registering information is considerable: for each additional bit, we double the number of possible theoretical values ​​on each of the three RVB layers. This additional colorimetric wealth is an asset in many photographic fields (e.g. landscape or still life) and makes it possible to have an even more important latitude in postproduction.

The presence of a central mechanical shutter in the objectives also allows it a maximum synchro-flash of 1/2000 e of second. Without equaling the best high -end specialized backs from the point of view of the definition (at the cost very much higher), a studio use is therefore perfectly possible, especially since the definition of its sensor remains generous.

If the X1DII-50C excels in certain fundamental areas, some characteristics allow us to glimpse what it cannot do. Thus, as is also the case with the boxes equipped with removable digital backs of the brand, the autofocus is far from being as efficient here as in 24 x 36, especially when the light decreases. In this area, the other two devices tested do better. With the X1DII, the user is taken to another placed and thoughtful practice. He will therefore make wonders in still life, landscape, architecture or portrait posed. On the other hand, the photograph of moving subjects remains difficult. If we were able to try in the street photo, only the situations allowing a time of anticipation necessary for setting up the development could have given satisfactory results.

Photo of Hasselblad X1D II-50c Photo of Hasselblad X1D II-50c

Furthermore, although the manufacturer seems to have made an effort on the autonomy side compared to the least modest performance of the batteries that equip the boxes provided for a use with a removable back, the X1DII battery has a limited margin. This is often the case with hybrids whose electronic targeting or screens must be supplied. However, this is particularly notable in this specific case. The fact remains that thanks to a very beautiful ergonomic study, this case is very pleasant to use outdoors.

Pentax 645Z: Middle -format reflex all -terrain

Unlike Hasselblad who chose to get out of his standards, Pentax has chosen continuity. Historical manufacturer of COLD SLR Boxes Costaud and voluminous, the Japanese manufacturer has for the moment chosen to follow the same digital voice. Thus, when it was released in 2010, the 645D is the first digital medium format at less than 10,000 euros and it is designed above all to operate in sometimes difficult external conditions. Its current successor, the 645Z, digs the same furrow: undoubtedly efficient and robust, thanks to a fully tropicalized metal design, it is the heaviest and bulky medium -sized monobloc format at the price studied.

The Pentax 645Z

The Pentax 645Z // Source: Olivier Gonin

The Pentax 645Z screen

The Pentax 645Z // Source screen: Olivier Gonin

The Pentax 645Z viewfinder

The Pentax 645z // Source viewfinder: Olivier Gonin

The Pentax 645Z mirror

The mirror of the Pentax 645Z // Source: Olivier Gonin

Contrary to the current trend, Pentax has also chosen to provide its medium format with a generous reflex aim, a choice which requires a substantial volume of box, but which turns out to be very interesting from a performance point of view. Sitting on its know-how in the Reflex universe, this box very comfortable in use allows in particular the use of a development module by more efficient phase correlation than those with detection of contrast of its competitors. It is thus perfectly able to ensure the point quickly and precisely, even when the brightness falls (as is the case of certain images below made at 1600 or 3200 ISO)).

Photo of the Pentax 645Z

Photo of the Pentax 645Z // Source: Olivier Gonin

Photo of the Pentax 645Z

Photo of the Pentax 645Z // Source: Olivier Gonin

Photo of the Pentax 645Z

Photo of the Pentax 645Z // Source: Olivier Gonin

Photo of the Pentax 645Z

Photo of the Pentax 645Z // Source: Olivier Gonin

This Safox 11 device of 27 collimators, including 25 on the cross, is based on the modules designed for conventional digital SLRs. Consequently, it mainly occupies the central part of the aim. If in any case the 645Z is not a discreet box, the choice of a reflex aim in the medium format requires the movement of a mirror also voluminous, the triggers are therefore significantly more noisy than those of the hybrid models equipped with an electronic aim.

The Pentax 645Z mirror

On the other hand, the Pentax case logically has a significantly more substantial autonomy, because it does not need to supply an electronic viewfinder or a screen permanently.

Fujifilm GFX 50R: cut for street photography

Also a historic actor of the medium -format universe in argentic, Fuji has the most diverse range in the medium -sized digital format universe “GFX”. The GFX 50R has caught our attention for several reasons. First of all, it is the most accessible to the means digital formats. In addition, his profile, clearly oriented towards an audience of street photographers very attentive to the image quality, clearly differentiates it from the two other boxes that we have so far mentioned.

The front of the Fujifilm GFX 50R

With its retro look recalling the golden age of reporters and its leai corner viewer, the GFX 50R displays a certain elegance.

The top of the Fujifilm GFX 50R

The top of the Fujifilm GFX 50R // Source: Olivier Gonin

The screen of the Fujifilm GFX 50R

The screen of the Fujifilm GFX 50R // Source: Olivier Gonin

The back of Fujifilm GFX 50R

The back of Fujifilm GFX 50R // Source: Olivier Gonin

Light and quite compact for a means of format, without reaching the level of the torque X1DII-50C-45P f/4 of Hasselblad in the matter, it offers an all-time finish allowing it to operate in sometimes difficult external conditions.

The Sony A7R IV and the Fujifilm GFX 50R

The Sony A7R IV and the Fujifilm GFX 50R // Source: Olivier Gonin

The Sony A7R IV and the Fujifilm GFX 50R

The Sony A7R IV and the Fujifilm GFX 50R // Source: Olivier Gonin

On the ergonomics side, it is in the logic of the boxes “X” manufacturer in the APS-C range. Like them, it offers largely articulated piloting around knobs and physical selectors. The control of the opening is also ensured by a ring directly located on the objective, the old. Overall we get used to it fairly quickly, even if, personally, I found too complicated to have to vary the shutter speed per deviation of 1 it by the main wheel located on the hood and 1 /3 of it by the rear wheel, but only in a limited interval of + or – 1 it. On the ground when the light changes quickly (ex: cloud passages) it quickly becomes far too complicated to grasp moving subjects with adequate reactivity.

Crucial point if any for a box intended for moving photo, its autofocus module by contrast detection gives interesting results. Without equaling the performance of a module by phase correlation, like that of 645z (especially when the brightness decreases), it is more suitable for a hand -lifting practice with mobile subjects than Hasselblad X1DII. If he therefore does his office in single mode, the continuous mode is far from satisfactory. He is therefore able to ensure his role in the context of a classic hand -lifting practice, but any practice a little too nervous (ex: sport, animal photo, etc.) nevertheless remains overall too much compared to the capacities of the GFX 50R. That said, in silver as in digital, medium -format boxes have never been designed to meet the needs of such practices: in their usual design, their usefulness is elsewhere.

As can be seen in the images below, the GFX 50R is discreet enough and sufficiently efficient for street photography (including to make the point on subjects against the light).

Photo of Fujifilm GFX 50R Photo of Fujifilm GFX 50R Photo of Fujifilm GFX 50R

We also find, as with his little brothers, the possibility of applying directly to the JPEGS of profiles likely to emulate the main FUJI films. The manufacturer’s regulars should therefore quickly find their young and users who do not wish, or not being able to spend too much time in front of post-processing software have the possibility of quickly producing JPEGs with a marked identity.

The integrated medium format: a fertile field in full mutation

Thanks to the technical and price developments offered in recent years, average digital photography was therefore able to emancipate itself from the studio and only big budget productions. Admittedly, as in argentic, the devices concerned are unable to offer the same versatility as the 24 x 36 or APS-C boxes, but the gain is very significant from the point of view of the image quality. The fact remains that even the most versatile boxes can only offer the same versatility as the high -end 24 x 36. At the time of choice, you must therefore clearly have in mind that if the means format is synonymous with a higher image quality level, it is not adapted to all the practices.

Although several manufacturers have made real efforts to democratize access to this universe until recently very closed, the price of this equipment clearly does not put it in a pot of all budgets. The fact remains that photographing with medium digital format has become much more accessible to specialists than in the past (especially since the second -hand market also tends to develop). This recent trend should also be amplified in the coming months, because when writing these lines, Fuji announces the upcoming release of an integrated means, with a better defined (102 Mpix) and stabilized: Fujifilm GFX 100S. It is offered at a certainly high exit price, but very studied in view of its performance and its opening to the video. To be continued…

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